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Redneck Aged Rib Roast

The rib roast is always a scary hunk of meat to cook because it likely cost more than what we want to pay. Most classic prime rib recipes cook at high heat (350 – 450) which sears the outside and leaves the interior, rare to medium rare on a good day. Keep reading
Depending on your rib roast size, a smaller rib roast will turn out more tender than a large one. On a large one, the heat has to travel so deep to hit target temperature the port sides of the roast’s band, will cook to medium, even well done increasing the bands' size. The longer the band gets cooked at higher heat, the drier and tougher it will be. For instance, a regular ole steak is typically seared at medium-high heat on both sides and pulled. Inevitably there is always someone who wants their steak well done. Their steak gets set off to the side of heat until it’s well done. Have you ever tasted one? It’s crap. It sat too long in higher temps. This recipe solves two issues, no matter the cooking vessel if it goes down to 205 it works and it’s a sure shot for that delicious taste you know. With the long pre-resting (redneck aging) the target temperature will sync into the center of your prime rib like a gentle cloud. This recipe does tack on some extra time. It will take about 20 – 30 minutes per pound. 3-4 hours not including redneck aging.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American, Southern, Texan
Prep Time 2 hours 10 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours 20 minutes
Total Time 4 hours 30 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 1362
Author Shawn

Ingredients

  • 4 lb rib roast 3-5 pound
  • ¼ cup Dawgs Bark
  • Cooking gloves recommended
  • A cooking thermometer with lead will help with not only this dish but many others.

Instructions

  • Take a plate, sprinkle Dawgs Bark on it, and lay the rib roast on it.
  • Sprinkle Dawgs Bark pretty thick all over roast nudging it in with the palm.
  • Insert the thermometer into center of the meat.
  • This part of the build starts the redneck aging process. Cover with a piece of plastic wrap and let sit on the counter for at least 2 hours. Ideally, 60 degrees internal would be best but may take too long. Stop resting at 2 hours.
  • Pre-heat your oven or pit to 205 degrees.
  • Turning your roast can be flat out dangerous to do with tongs. I highly recommend cooking gloves that allow you to flip with hands and not get burned.
  • Pull thermometer.
  • In a large oven-ready med-high heat pan (375° to 475°), pour a shot of olive oil, sear all sides of the roast (4 biggest sides), 3 minutes on each side.
  • Re-insert the thermometer and set the rib roast in pan bone down.
  • Carefully place the pan in center of oven or grill.
  • Cook and don’t open oven until internal temperature reaches 125 degrees. That should get your rib roast up to medium rare. An additional 5 degrees will move it up to medium and so on.
  • When it reaches 125 pull from oven/smoker and let rest until the temperature drops to 120. While the rib roast rests down to 120, the temperature will go up first then back down. Usually, it will go to 130 then decline, however. I had seen them almost punch 140 before it started to go back down.
  • Your results could vary due to the size of the rib roast. Other than that it’s ready! De-bone and slice up or start cutting, Dawgs Bark’s crust will make heads spin.

Nutrition

Serving: 355g | Calories: 1362kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 61g | Fat: 120g | Saturated Fat: 50g | Cholesterol: 274mg | Sodium: 1347mg | Potassium: 1025mg | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 5IU | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 6.6mg